photo provided by Arjan de Visser

SY01: Experimental evolution on empirical fitness landscapes

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
J. Arjan G.M. de Visser and Santiago F. Elena
Invited speakers:
Tim Cooper and Joachim Krug
Description:
To arrive at a quantitative understanding of adaptation, we need to identify the factors that determine its dynamics and understand how they do so quantitatively. A prominent recent development is to consider the structure of the fitness landscape and how this determines the outcome of adaptation. Microbial experimental evolution contributes to this development by exploring the structure of real fitness landscapes, either by constructing mutants carrying combinations of observed beneficial mutations, or by studying the contingency of evolution on particular genotypes and conditions. The aim of this symposium is to highlight diverse examples of the empirical study of fitness landscapes using microbial experimental evolution [and their contribution to quantitative models of adaptation].

photo provided by Tom Tregenza

SY02: Selection and evolution in natural populations

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Tom Tregenza and Trine Bilde
Invited speakers:
Ary Hoffmann, Jane Reid and Susan Johnston
Description:
This symposium will showcase studies designed to understand evolution by monitoring natural populations over multiple generations. It will highlight new model systems as well as recent discoveries in established systems. There will be a particular emphasis on innovative approaches to measuring selection in the wild, including new methodologies for measuring the success of genes and individuals. These will include the use of genetic markers, exploitation of natural pedigrees and new tagging and monitoring approaches.

photo provided by Frédéric Brunet and Rita Ponce

SY03: Molecular evolutionary innovations

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Frédéric Brunet and Rita Ponce
Invited speakers:
Vaishali Katju and Dan I. Andersson
Description:
Evolutionary innovations, including evolution of new functions, bear the hallmarks of genome plasticity. During this symposium we will consider studies that have discovered and traced-down these events, mechanisms involved in their origin, the dynamics and fate of novelties, and the tools allowing their retrieval at the genomic level. Emphasis will be given to studies detailing changes at the molecular and cellular level up to those showing behavioural impact.

photo provided by Mario X. Ruiz-González

SY04: Evolution of Symbiotic Interactions in Communities: Novel Approaches

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Kayla King, Mario X. Ruiz-González, Jérôme Orivel and Justyna Wolinska
Invited speakers:
Christoph Vorburger and Jacobus Jan Boomsma
Description
Biological interactions within communities shape the evolution of individual species. These relationships (obligate/facultative, beneficial/detrimental) force the emergence of innovative traits. The most exciting research on these topics now combines comparative “omics” approaches with concepts from evolutionary and behavioural ecology. The symposium will highlight recent progress in this interdisciplinary field and will discuss the interplay between communities and evolutionary biology: how do species interactions within a community affect evolution?

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SY05: Phenotypic plasticity: mechanisms, ecology and evolution

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Patricia Gibert and Patrícia Beldade
Invited speakers:
Jacintha Ellers and Anthony Zera
Description:
Phenotypic plasticity refers to the ability of a genotype to produce different phenotypes in different environments. Its study integrates multiple disciplines and analyses at all levels of biological organization; from the molecular regulation of changes in organismal development, to variation in phenotypes and fitness in natural populations. The symposium welcomes work searching to understand how changes in external environment affect (or not) phenotype, how alternative phenotype perform in distinct environmental conditions, and how that weighs into account for the evolution of plasticity.

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SY06: Evolutionary consequences of an early germ-soma segregation

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Duur K. Aanen and Rick Michod
Invited speakers:
Norman Arnheim and Andrew Bourke
Description:
It has been 25 years since Leo Buss first proposed that an early segregation of a germ line from the rest of the body is an adaptation to limit the scope for selfish cell lineages. A number of recent discoveries make it timely to reevaluate this hypothesis. This symposium explores the evolutionary stability of multicellularity in organisms with and without an early germ-line sequestration, to discuss the relative importance of this characteristic for conflict resolution.

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SY07: The nature and mechanisms of evolution of species recognition systems

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Guila Ganem and John Endler
Invited speakers:
Tamra Mendelson and John Endler
Description:
What makes a mate recognition system specific? Is species recognition a good working concept? How does specificity evolve? Do the mechanisms involved differ in the presence or absence of gene flow? These questions are central to our understanding of evolution of behavioral isolation, one of the most important means of species diversification, and the symposium goal is to address them.

photo provided by Oliver Bossdorf

SY08: Evolutionary significance of epigenetic variation

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Oliver Bossdorf and Koen Verhoeven
Invited speakers:
Frank Johannes, Carlos Herrera and Christina Richards
Description:
Epigenetic mechanisms can have long­lasting effects on phenotypes, but what role do they play in evolution? Recent research provides evidence that epigenetic mechanisms can create heritable trait variation, that epigenetic variation can be heritably altered by the environment. Moreover, studies in natural populations suggest an epigenetic role in adaptation. This symposium presents the current status of the growing research field of ecological and evolutionary epigenetics.

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SY09: Genetics and genomics of host-­parasite coevolution

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Joachim Kurtz and Hinrich Schulenburg
Invited speaker:
Frank Jiggins and Ellen Decaestecker
Description:
Host­-parasite coevolution often leads to fast evolutionary changes. It thus represents an ideal model for studying processes of rapid adaptation. Key to these studies is an understanding of the underlying genetics and genomics, because they help us identify the specific traits under selection and also the type of selective processes involved. Our symposium focuses on current advances in this field, taking advantage of recent innovations in high throughput sequencing technology.

ESEB 2013

SY10: Genomics and experimental evolution

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Tadeusz J. Kawecki and Michael G. Ritchie
Invited speakers:
Rees Kassen and Thomas Flatt
Description:
This symposium will focus on the application of whole genome resequencing and other high-throughput omics techniques (RNAseq, metabolomics) to experimental evolution, in a broad range of experimental systems. It will facilitate the exchange of information about the questions addressed, techniques adopted and result obtained by different research groups, but also encourage the spread of best practice concerning design and statistical approaches, which are being actively developed in this emerging field.

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SY11: Advances in quantitative approaches to recent evolutionary change in humans

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Alexandre Courtiol and Ian Rickard
Invited speakers:
Maarten Larmuseau and Stephen Stearns
Description:
Applying a rigorous evolutionary framework to understand human biology and behaviour present numerous challenges. However, many recent advances have brought this field to a point where resolution of past difficulties may be achieved. The goal of this symposium is to provide a diverse overview of the state-of-the-art in quantitative approaches to investigating human evolution at different levels of biological organisation.

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SY12: Studying multigene-family evolution in the post-genomic era: Towards a population genomic approach to MHC evolution

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Reto Burri and Robert Ekblom
Invited speakers:
Jim Kaufman, Jacek Radwan and David Richardson
Description:
Multigene families, like the MHC, encode central components in pathways involved in individual fitness and are key to important adaptations. Elucidating the molecular processes involved in their evolution is an important issue to further our understanding of the genetic basis of biological diversification. Here, we aim at bringing together researchers studying the functional genomics, evolutionary ecology and population genomics of MHC to discuss the most recent developments in each of the fields and develop new ideas and future research directions that integrate the different branches of MHC evolution in particular and multigene family evolution in general.

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SY13: Rapid evolution and population genetics

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Lutz Becks and Teppo Hiltunen
Invited speakers:
Joachim Hermisson, Hildegard Uecker and Richard Neher
Description:
While the synthesis of the so-called eco-evolutionary dynamics has seen large advances in the last decades, there is still further need to illuminate the relationship between ecology and evolution. In particular, we believe that the integration of rapid, contemporary evolution into studies of population genetics has largely been ignored.

ESEB 2013

SY14: Non genetic inheritance

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Benoit Pujol and Katie Stopher
Invited speakers:
Kevin Laland and Etienne Danchin
Description:
Evidence is accruing that epigenetic, developmental, parental, ecological and cultural inheritance mechanisms have a major impact on the evolution of phenotypic diversity. The aim of this symposium is to highlight novel results and synthesize our knowledge on the contribution of non-genetic inheritance to evolutionary processes. We will also explore the need for an extended theory of evolution where genes are not the only inheritance system.

ESEB 2013

SY15: Attack and defense: evolutionary and ecological consequences of individual variation

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Anna-Liisa Laine and Pedro Vale
Invited speakers:
Meghan Duffy and Marcel Salathé
Description:
Understanding disease spread and host-pathogen co-evolution are central questions in disease biology. Accurate predictions of these processes are made more difficult due to individual variation in defense and attack strategies of hosts and pathogens. This symposium will bring together theoretical and empirical approaches across a broad range of biological systems, to embrace individual level variation in host-pathogen interactions, and its population level consequences.

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SY16: Evolutionary biology in China

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Roger Butlin and Kai Zeng
Description:
The aim of the symposium is to show-case the expanding field of evolutionary biology in China. The organisers and lead speakers will use it to encourage Chinese scientists to attend the ESEB Congress. This will be an excellent opportunity for the initiation of new, mutually-beneficial collaborations as well as to raise awareness in both Europe and China of ongoing work and key groups.

photo provided by Marc Robinson-Rechavi from originals provided by Patrícia Beldade and Laurent Excoffier

SY17: Linking genome evolution at different time scales

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Nicolas Salamin and Marc Robinson-Rechavi
Invited speakers:
Chris Jiggins and Laurent Excoffier
Descriptions:
The inferrence of evolutionary forces, notably selection, from molecular data, has a long tradition in evolutionary biology. Studies usually focus either on interspecific or on intraspecific data, and thus address disconnected questions. Thanks to advances in genomics and in computational biology, there is increasing interest in bridging the gap between these two fundamental scales of evolution. This symposium will provide exciting discussions and prospects to where next-generation sequencing data can lead us in the understanding of the selective forces acting during evolution.

photo provided by Ulrich Steiner

SY18: Evolutionary demography

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Ulrich K. Steiner and Barbara Pietrzak
Invited speakers:
Rebecca Sear and Tim Coulson
Description:
This symposium aims to stimulate cross disciplinary exchange in the emerging field of evolutionary demography that explores evolutionary and ecological processes that shape birth and death of individuals and populations. Evolutionary theory is formulated in demographic characteristics including structure, fitness, selection, and change. Specific emphasis is given on aging and senescence with the individual serving as link between the lower mechanistic level and the higher functional level both from a biological and demographic perspective. This symposium is co-organized by the Max-Planck Society.

photo provided by Mikael Mökkönen

SY19: Evolutionary consequences of deception

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Carita Lindstedt-Kareksela and Mikael Mökkönen
Invited speakers:
Martin Stevens, Tom Sherratt and Johanna Mappes
Description:
The ability to deceive oneself, conspecifics or individuals of other species is a fundamental aspect to many coevolutionary struggles. Brood parasites have the ability to produce eggs that exactly resemble the egg coloration of their host species, while alternative mating strategies employed by ‘sneaker’ individuals circumvent confrontation in intrasexual competition - these are just a few examples of widely known deceptive strategies in the animal kingdom. Deception allows individuals to gain an evolutionary advantage in reproduction and/or survival, such as through deceptive colour mimicry, predator-prey systems, sexually antagonistic encounters with a mate, parent-offspring interactions or competition over resources. Much of the existing research on deception has been fragmented into various topics with limited interaction, even though there are some common themes such as frequency dependent selection, manipulation of the receiver’s sensory system, and the antagonistic coupling of the actor’s benefits to costs of the recipient(s). Thus, our goals of this symposium are to unify researchers from different fields, as well as provide opportunities to present novel findings, questions, and different perspectives in an effort to better understand the costs and benefits of deception.

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SY20: Mechanisms of trade-offs

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Bas Zwaan and Thomas Flatt
Invited speakers:
Stephen Stearns
Description:
Trade-offs are key in evolutionary theory: traits can only evolve in the direction of increased fitness at the expense of loss of fitness through other traits. Because organisms are universally restricted in resource acquisition, trade-offs have been explained by differential resource allocation. Recent molecular data has challenged the validity of this view. Unfortunately, up to date, trade-offs have either mostly been approached from a purely phenotypic perspective without much attention to the underlying physiological mechanisms, or conclusions have been drawn about trade-offs from molecular studies without considering the functional phenotype. Here, we aim to bridge these views by linking our current knowledge of the molecular and physiological pathways with that about quantitative genetic and phenotypic correlations between traits.

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SY21: The evolution and maintenance of heritable colour polymorphisms: from ecology to genomes

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Maren Wellenreuther and Bengt Hansson
Invited speakers:
Rosemary G. Gillespie and Jon Slate
Description:
Heritable colour polymorphisms are widespread in nature but the processes governing the maintenance and evolution of different morphs in the wild are rarely well understood. The field of polymorphism research is currently progressing rapidly because of the fruitful integration of ecology and genetics with bioinformatics and genome technology. This advancement allows researchers to now address questions about evolutionary processes of polymorphisms, such as the genomic patterns of selection and the functional consequences of genetic architecture.

photo provided by Gabriel Perron

SY22: The evolution and genetics of drug resistance

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Pleuni Pennings, Gabriel G. Perron, Sarah Cobey and R. Fredrik Inglis
Invited speakers:
Cally Roper and Craig MacLean
Description:
The evolution of drug resistance in pathogenic microorganisms is one of the most important challenges facing evolutionary biologists. Evolutionary studies of drug resistance can aid the development of effective clinical strategies. At the same time, such studies help further our general understanding of evolutionary biology. Our symposium provides a venue to discuss experimental and theoretical studies that improve basic understanding and/or inform clinical practice.

photo provided by Sarah Helyar

SY23: Genomic Islands: their role in adaptation and speciation

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Rui Faria, Sarah Helyar, Chris Jiggins, Gary R. Carvalho, Arcadi Navarro and Carole Smadja
Invited speakers:
Jeffrey Feder, Nick Barton and Patrick Nosil
Description:
Genome-wide data offers a unique opportunity to gain an insight into the genomic architecture involved in the adaptive divergence found in heterogeneous environments which can lead to local adaptation, reproductive isolation and ultimately speciation. By considering a range of species and approaches, this symposium will explore the interactions of diversifying selection and homogenizing gene flow to identify trends in genomic evolution which accompany adaptation and ecological speciation. The symposium will focus on both theory and empirical data to assess the importance (or otherwise) of genomic islands of divergence.

This symposium is sponsored by the European Science Foundation
The European Science Foundation (ESF) provides a platform for its Member Organisations to advance science and explore new directions for research at the European level.

Established in 1974 as an independent non-governmental organisation, the ESF currently serves 78 Member Organisations across 30 countries.

photo provided by Anna Mazzarella

SY24: Unifying paleobiological and comparative perspectives on character evolution

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Lee‐Hsiang Liow and Thomas F. Hansen
Invited speakers:
Gene Hunt and Folmer Bokma
Descriptions:
It is no longer debated that the fossil record is necessary to inform us about the history of life, yet the integration of data and perspectives using fossils and comparative data in understanding evolution is far from mature. This symposium gathers researchers straddling the realms of the extinct and the extant to explore how we can better understand evolutionary processes especially on time scales common to palaeobiological and phylogenetic comparative studies, using character evolution as a focal point.

photo provided by Jason L. Brown

SY25: New directions in sex role research

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Tamás Székely and Michael Jennions
Invited speakers:
Hanna Kokko and Larry J. Young
Description:
The evolution of sex roles is a core area in evolutionary biology linking life history and sexual selection theory. Recent advances in theory, experimental tests and phylogenetic analyses have provided fresh insights into sex roles. The Symposium will focus on 3 aspects of these recent developments.

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SY26: The genomic architecture of adaptive traits: do QTNS generally exist?

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Christopher W. Wheat
Invited speakers:
Matt Rockman, Thomas Mitchell-Olds and William Cresko
Description:
This symposium is focused upon presenting a balanced perspective upon what we currently know about the genomic architecture of adaptive traits. While one part of the evolutionary genetic community is declaring that the QTN paradigm is a fruitless pursuit, others are finding genes of very large effects on fitness in the wild. Trying to generalize from these disparate findings is the goal of this symposia.

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SY27: Evolutionary conservation: the applied side of evolutionary biology

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Christophe Eizaguirre, Miguel A. Baltazar-Soares and Victor Stiebens
Invited speakers:
Simone Sommer, Jacob Höglund and Louis Bernatchez
Description:
Conservation biology is one of the rare fields of biology where evolution has too often been neglected. The reason for this probably stems from the misconception that evolution does not act on an ecologically relevant time scale. Here, we aim to combine the fields of evolutionary (e.g. ecological genomics, host-parasite interactions) and conservation biology to demonstrate the necessity to consider evolutionary theories (e.g. effects of inbreeding, constraints on small populations) in conservation programs.

photo provided by Olivia Roth

SY28: Non-genetic transfer of immunity across generations – evolution and underlying mechanisms

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Olivia Roth and Gerrit Joop
Invited speakers:
Mike Boots
Description:
To cope with parasites and pathogens, immunological experience can be transferred across generations also non-genetically, allowing for higher adaptive plasticity. Recent studies suggest that trans-generational immune priming (TGIP) can also be provided by innate defence components and that it is not limited to maternal effects. Both evolutionary and mechanistic advances in TGIP should be addressed in this symposium in systems ranging from invertebrates to vertebrates.
This symposium is sponsored by the Volkswagen Foundation

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SY29: Actively learning evolution: methods and resources

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Alexandra Isabel Sá Pinto, Rita Campos and Kristin Jenkins
Invited speaker:
Tom Meagher
Description:
This symposium aims to explore methods and resources available for inquiry based teaching of evolution and to discuss the impacts of such methods on both students’ and the public’s understanding and engagement with evolution. Speakers will present information about effective teaching methods and demonstrate methods and resources through hands on activities.

ESEB 2013

SY30: Phylogenetics and phylogeography

Schedule Abstracts

Organiser:
Thomas Schmitt and Richard Nichols
Invited Speaker:
Lacey Knowles and Emily Lemmon
Description:
This is a wide scope session mostly addressing aspects in the field of geographical distribution pattern of genetic information. Novel data enlarging our knowledge on range dynamics of species are highly welcome as well as presentations advancing the analytical tool and methodological aspects in this field.
However, this session not only includes phylogenetics and phylogeography approaches, but also landscape genetics and a wide range of topics on the evolutionary processes across species ranges and of conservation aspects in larger scale population genetics.

photo provided by Élio Sucena

SY31: Development, behaviour and evolution

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Élio Sucena and Christen Mirth
Invited speaker:
Cristina Ledon-Rettig, Laura Corley Lavine, Wiliam Jeffery and Emilie Snell-Rood
Evolution moulds developmental processes to create the diversity of morphologies, life history strategies and behaviours displayed across organisms. Recent developments in areas such as genomics and developmental biology promises to further broaden our perspectives of this topic. This symposium aims to bring together investigators working on various aspects of the development, behaviour and evolution of phenotypes to highlight exciting new avenues of research and stimulate the exchange of ideas.

ESEB 2013

SY32: Climate change and evolution

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Ary Hoffmann and Mauro Santos
Invited speaker:
Ary Hoffmann
Description:
An increasing number of empirical studies and theoretical analyses consider the likelihood of populations evolving in response to the direct and indirect effects arising from rapid climate change. In this symposium we aim to provide an update of the recent literature. We also focus on studies that have investigated ways to increase evolutionary resilience in species particularly by altering patterns of gene flow within landscapes and by enhancing genetic variation within populations.

ESEB 2013

SY33: Population ecology

Schedule Abstracts

Organisers:
Ricardo Beldade and Michael Morrissey
Invited speakers:
Jean Clobert and Michael Morrissey
Description:
This symposium will include evolutionary perspectives on population ecology themes such as dispersal and life cycles in populations and meta-populations. The symposium will focus on theoretical and empirical developments in dispersal and life-cycle research welcoming synthetic approaches that span across taxa within these themes.

ESEB 2013

SY34: General symposium

Schedule Abstracts

Contacts

Chairman: Octávio S. Paulo
Tel: 00 351 217500614 direct
Tel: 00 351 217500000 ext22359
Fax: 00 351 217500028
email: mail@eseb2013.com

Address

XIV Congress of the European Society for Evolutionary Biology

Organization Team
Department of Animal Biology (DBA)
Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon
P-1749-016 Lisbon
Portugal

Website

Computational Biology & Population Genomics Group 
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